We found your school on the internet…the teaching, service and facilities are very good…


Anna Maria Aiazzi, Susanne Innocenti and Donatelle Bordati (pictured above) are teachers of English at Chinochini School in Florence in Tuscany in Italy (one of the most beautiful parts of that country, but that’s another story!).  Currently, they are here with 26 students from their city, on a study tour/holiday in Edinburgh.  They come to the British Isles every year, going to Scotland, Ireland and England consecutively.  They kindly agreed to meet to tell us their thoughts about Edinburgh, Scotland and Global School of English.

“We found your school on the internet.  We’ve only been here for a few days so far but the teaching, service and facilities are very good. Helen Marshall on reception in particular has been very helpful.

“The families our students are staying with are good too. It makes a big difference having good host families. We have to travel into Edinburgh every day so we get to see a lot of the city. The public transport is very good.

“For most of our students, this is their first time in Scotland. Some have been to Dublin and London.  The students are certainly enjoying being in Edinburgh, which we find very safe.

“We’ve been to Stirling Castle and we’re going on a trip to the Highlands and Loch Ness. The myth of the Loch Ness Monster is famous all over the world.  Back in Edinburgh, we’re also going to see the Elephant House Café, where JK Rowling began to write the Harry Potter books.

“Our school in Florence is a vocational school, where the students study technical subjects, food and drink management, electronics, etc. They all know that studying English is important because it’s the main world language for business and at some time in their working lives they’ll have to use it.

“However, as well as improving their English, we believe that one of the main benefits of coming to study abroad is that the students get to experience other cultures and peoples.  While the food in Scotland is different from our meals at home, and the weather is certainly very different, we find that these are some of the best memories our students take away from these trips.  They also learn about the history of these other countries.

“Overall, we are very satisfied with the way everything has gone and we would be happy to recommend Global School of English to anyone who wants to come to study English in the UK.”

Interview, Alastair Blair

 

Five more interesting things about Edinburgh

The QueenThe Queen’s husband, Prince Philip, is the Duke of Edinburgh.  This title was created in 1726, for Prince Frederick, the son of George I.

The famous Royal Mile in Edinburgh runs from the Castle down the hill to Holyrood Palace.  It is actually one mile and 107 yards!

Edinburgh Castle  is built on a volcano.  Don’t worry though, it’s extinct and has not erupted for 350 million years!

Edinburgh was the first city in the world to have its own Fire Brigade, in 1703.

Many people nowadays like body piercings. However, not many have as many as Edinburgh’s Elaine Davidson who is the world’s most pierced woman, with more than 9,000 piercings!

Some interesting things about Glasgow

Lots of students at Global School travel the short distance to the west to see Glasgow, Scotland’s biggest city. It’s very different from Edinburgh.  Here are some interesting facts about Glasgow that you might not know.

The Horseshoe Bar in Glasgow city centre was established in 1884 by John Scouller who was a captain in the cavalry. The Horseshoe  has the longest bar in the UK, measuring 104ft 4in in length.

The film star Roy Rogers and his horse, Trigger, rode all the way round the Horseshoe Bar in 1954.

Glasgow also has the tallest cinema in the world, the Cineworld in Renfrew Street. It is 62 metres high, has 18 screens spread across six floors and up to 633 people at a time can attend.

Unlike Edinburgh, Glasgow no longer has a castle. However, it does have Castle Street, near the Cathedral. That’s where the castle used to be, but all traces were finally demolished in 1792.

People from Glasgow are called Glaswegians (or ‘weegies’ if you are from Edinburgh!). However, the term is relatively new, being first used by Sir Walter Scott in 1817.